OneLoad (Powered by TubeMogul) Updates TOS Regarding Affiliate Marketers

by Missy Ward in Affiliate Marketing   &  , ,   2 Comments

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Back in February, TubeMogul moved its video syndication and analytics service to its own site, OneLoad.com

If you’re not familiar with OneLoad, its a tool that gives folks the opportunity to upload their videos to multiple sites (like YouTube, Vimeo, MetaCafe, Facebook, Twitter, Blip.tv and more) at one time and track the results from all of the sites, in one place. I’ve been using the service since 2007 and found it to be a great time saver. It’s free (for non-commercial use) and offers different pricing tiers for its commercial use customers.

After receiving notification of the name change, I didn’t think much of it (other than having to remember the new website address) until I read a blog post on Daniel Clark’s QAQN blog, where he discussed his dissatisfaction regarding OneLoad’s policy as it related to affiliate marketers.

At the time, their sign up page indicated:

Old OneLoad Terms of Service

and Section 4e of their Terms of Service stated:

“…upload, post or transmit unsolicited commercial email or “spam”. This includes unethical marketing, advertising, or any other practice that is in any way connected with “spam”, such as (a) sending mass email to recipients who haven’t requested email from you or with a fake return address, (b) promoting a site with inappropriate links, titles, descriptions, or (c) promoting your Content by posting multiple submissions in public forums that are identical. Also defined as “spam” are any videos involving affiliate marketing, network marketing, cash gifting, multi-level marketing, phishing, or any videos that a reasonable person would consider to be a scam or misleading. Further, “spam” can include any content that TubeMogul deems not entertaining or informative;”

After reading that post, I reached out to the folks at OneLoad, and although sympathetic, they were not ready to change the language in their Terms of Service. That was a problem for me, because many of the presentations that I’ve done in the past as well as one scheduled for an upcoming conference in June, promoted the service as an efficient way for affiliate marketers to upload their quality videos to top video and social networking sites and track their effectiveness.

But, what was most upsetting to me was the fact that OneLoad was still wary of the affiliate marketing industry overall, despite its dramatic growth and positive forecast. I knew I had to reach out to Brett Wilson, their CEO to get a better understanding of their past issues, to see if there was a way that his company and affiliate marketers could work together in the future.

Oddly enough, TubeMogul had a booth down the same aisle as Affiliate Summit during SXSW in March. This afforded me the opportunity to talk with Brett quickly and follow up after the show. To sum it up, some of the issues that they were experiencing with a portion of the affiliate marketing videos, directly related to policies the video sites had themselves — they just don’t want overtly commercial content.

I get that. I don’t want to watch overly commercial content either.

Brett mentioned that OneLoad would be happy if affiliate marketers used the service with well-produced videos that have some entertainment value. (More commercial use customers means more $$ for OneLoad.)

I explained that in order for that to happen, they’d have to modify the language in their Terms of Service so that legitimate marketers could feel confident that their accounts were not going to get shut down just because they tagged a video as “affiliate” or “affiliate marketing”.

And so, they did. Here’s the new, re-worded section, which offers protection to affiliate marketers who are producing quality videos that are not scammy or misleading.

“…upload, post or transmit unsolicited commercial email or “spam”. This includes unethical marketing, advertising, or any other practice that is in any way connected with “spam”, such as (a) sending mass email to recipients who haven’t requested email from you or with a fake return address, (b) promoting a site with inappropriate links, titles, descriptions, or (c) promoting your Content by posting multiple submissions in public forums that are identical. Also defined as “spam” are any videos involving network marketing, cash gifting, multi-level marketing, phishing, affiliate marketing with low quality content or any videos that a reasonable person would consider to be a scam or misleading. Further, “spam” can include any content that TubeMogul deems not entertaining or informative;”

I’m glad that OneLoad.com was open to changing their policy because their service really saves marketers a lot of time and definitely helps with getting a better idea of what their customer base wants.

If you’re new to OneLoad or need some help getting started, they offer a New User Webinar every Friday, which you should check out.

Let me know your thoughts.

Comment & Add Your Voice

1 Ileane April 12, 2012 at 7:44 pm

Hi Missy, thanks for sharing this information. I’m an avid user of OneLoad and I was very grateful to find out that they changed their terms so that ethical affiliate marketers could continue using their platform.

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2 Jeff Grill April 9, 2012 at 12:08 pm

Hi Missy,

Thanks for the update on TubeMogul/OneLoad. I’m about to launch a video series and had this specific issue as to where the lines are between site promotion and affiliate.

Jeff

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